executive function disorder symptoms

Executive Function Disorder Symptoms

Executive function disorder symptoms vary from individual to individual. It’s also important to note that if you suspect your child has executive function disorder you should schedule an assessment with your doctor to be absolutely sure.

This article is not meant to help diagnose your child with executive function disorder, it’s meant to guide you on a path towards further treatment if you suspect it is needed.

If your child is exhibiting any of the following executive function disorder symptoms it may be grounds towards seeking further information from your doctor.

Typical Executive Function Disorder Symptoms

Executive function disorder can usually be identified by a few telltale symptoms, which all equate to a pronounced difficulty in performing daily tasks.

Tasks that people simply go through as part of their day to day lives are a challenge for those with executive function disorder. This includes things like having organization to their lives and sticking to schedules.

Some of the symptoms that could lead to difficulty in carrying out day to day tasks are hyperactivity, inattentiveness, and impulsivity. Executive function disorder symptoms can be seen very early on in life because that’s when the brain starts to develop.

Executive Function Disorder Symptoms: Early Stages

Executive function disorder begins around the time that one enters into puberty. Puberty is when the frontal cortex of the brain starts to mature. This area of the brain is responsible for enabling people to carry out very high level tasks.

Think of the tasks that the leader of a company would be expected to perform, or an entrepreneur, or someone going through high levels of schooling. These all involve 6 components of executive function, which are as follows:

  • Analyze
  • Plan
  • Organize
  • Develop
  • Adjust
  • Complete

Someone without executive function disorder would be able to:

  • Analyze a task
  • Create a plan to complete the task
  • Organize the various steps involved in completing the task
  • Develop a scheduling for when each step should be completed
  • Adjust the plan on the fly if needed
  • And finally, complete the task on time.

It’s possible that your child is exhibiting executive function disorder symptoms if he or she has difficulties following a task through to completion as outlined above.

Another symptom of executive function disorder may be if your child can complete tasks, but routinely misses deadlines when doing so. This could involve handing in homework late, not having an assignment done on time, and so on.

Executive function disorder symptoms can be well observed in a child’s school life. EFD can lead to a child losing papers, homework, and other items that a child needs to stay organized in school.

Symptoms can also be observed in the child’s home life. A child with executive function disorder may have trouble keeping track of personal items or organizing their room.

If your child just can’t seem to grasp these everyday tasks after trying over and over again, then he or she may be demonstrating executive function disorder symptoms.

As mentioned at the beginning of this post, don’t diagnose your child simply by what you read online. Make an appointment with your doctor if you believe you’re seeing EFD symptoms in your child.

Alternatively, we invite you to try out our free games, many of which are designed to identify your child’s executive functions strengths and challenges.

 

Image Credit: Flickr User hepingting

 

#AutismChat: Creating A Community of People Touched by Autism

autism_chat_image__large_

Identifor is hosting a live Twitter chat about autism this week and we’d love to have you join us! The popularity of our last twitter chat means we already have another one ready for Thursday at 7pm est/ 4pm pst.

We’re expecting a lively discussion amongst people from all walks of life — doctors, medical professionals, those with autism, those on the spectrum, friends and family of those with autism, and the list goes on.

As part of our extended Identifor family, yes you, we’d love to see your face alongside our hashtag #AutismChat on Thursday at 7pm est / 4pm pst.

Knowing what we know about autism, we understand if you’re asking yourself right now, “What is a Twitter chat and why should I be a part of one?”

If you’ve never done something before, it helps to know what kind of benefits you can expect from it. Why should you attend? Frankly, it wouldn’t be much of a chat if you didn’t join us, now would it?

Humor aside, a Twitter chat about autism is an opportunity for you to connect with other like-minded people and discuss topics surrounding autism that are important to them. Our goal is to create a community of people touched by autism.

We typically begin each chat with a list of 8 topics. One by one, we take our time discussing the topics while appending the hashtag #AutismChat at the end of the tweets.

You can easily keep up with the conversation even if you’re not following everyone by using a website that’s designed for Twitter chats. We recommend www.tweetchat.com.

Simply go to that site, enter the hashtag, and click “Yes” when the prompt comes up asking you to authorize your Twitter account. Then you’ll be able to actively participate in the conversation, and maybe make some new friends and connections along the way.

This Week’s Autism Chat

If you weren’t able to make it to last week’s Autism Chat, you can catch up on what you missed here and get a feel for what to expect in this week’s.

Here are some sample topics that we may cover in this week’s (12/17) chat:  

  • Q1. What do you want people to know about you?
  • Q2. Do you like feeling different or would you rather blend in?
  • Q3. What is your favorite game?
  • Q4. Do you use body language more or words more?
  • Q5. Do you like to go to the park?
  • Q6. What’s your favorite place to get food from?
  • Q7. What music do you listen to?
  • Q8. Favorite thing for people to tell you?

Please keep in mind, especially if you’re new to Twitter chats, that when you’re responding to a specific question it works best if you preface your tweets with A1, A2, A3, etc.

We will have TWO co-hosts for this week, Kathy @GarageNinja1 and Laurie @LaurieMit  – plus their two kids!

Again, Autism Chat occurs each week on Thursday at 7pm est/ 4pm pst. We look forward to having you join us. If there’s a topic you want to discuss that you don’t see listed, please let us know and we’d be happy to look into using it in future Autism Chats.

how to join a twitter chat

How to Join a Twitter Chat

Trying to figure out how to join a Twitter chat but don’t know where to start? Let this blog post be a primer for you, so afterward you’ll feel less intimidated about joining a Twitter chat next time you’re invited.

First of all, don’t feel intimidated. The reason why Twitter chats are popular is because they’re fun with not much of a learning curve.

Learning how to join a Twitter chat is even easier when you factor in the free, web-based tools out there designed specifically for participating in Twitter chats. We’ll get into those tools more later on.

Before we get too far ahead of ourselves, let’s start with the basics.

Basics of How to Join a Twitter Chat

Hashtags
We’re going into this post assuming you have at least a moderate understanding of how to use Twitter. Know how to find and follow a hashtag? Perfect! That’s where it all starts.

Every Twitter chat is based on a hashtag. For example, you can look up #AutismChat to see how hashtags are used in these conversations.

Schedules
The term “Twitter chat” sounds like a casual conversation, which for the most part it is, but it’s run more like a structured meeting.

By that, we mean there are dates and times for all Twitter chats — they don’t just occur at random. This requires all participants to set aside the same block of time in their day to meet up on Twitter for a town-hall-style discussion.

This kind of regimented scheduling helps ensure that there’s consistency and routine to the discussion, and it also helps attract people who are truly serious about participating.

Topics
Many Twitter chats have pre-set topics for each chat. You might want to ask the Twitter chat owner what the topic is if they don’t let you know ahead of time.

Make sure you’re following the creator/facilitator of the Twitter chat to stay informed of the next topics of discussion. Or if you want to be completely spontaneous, you can do that as well — it is up to you.

Action
Now it’s time to put all of this into action. You know the hashtag of the Twitter chat, you’ve got the date and time marked in your calendar, and you have the discussion questions ready.

What’s next?

Navigate to TweetChat.com when you’re ready for it to start. Enter the hashtag of the Twitter chat and hit “Go”. You will be prompted to log in with your Twitter account in order to participate. From there you will be presented with a stream of tweets from the chat updated in real time.

Right within TweetChat.com you can reply, retweet or send your own tweets to add to the discussion. The beauty of TweetChat.com is that anything you tweet out will be automatically appended with the hashtag you specified when you landed on the site.

Or, visit this this page for our #AutismChat live stream.

If you have any other questions about how to join a Twitter chat, we’re always happy to help.

Careers For People With Autism

Careers for people with autism should be chosen based on the strengths generally shared by people with autism and autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

As an example, a person may have poor short-term working memory while having above-average long-term memory. With that knowledge, you may want to rule out jobs or careers that rely on short-term memory when considering careers options.

However, that’s not to say that all of the recommended careers for people are suitable for everyone.

Some individuals with autism might gravitate more towards careers where they have to use their visual memory. Some may be more suited for careers where they have to work with numbers. Some may need to have a career where they work outdoors, and so on.

With that said, there are some general rules of thumb when it comes to choosing careers for people with autism. We’ll go over a few of them in this post.

How to Find Careers for People With Autism

When it comes to finding the right careers for people with autism, there are a few thing you need to keep in mind.

The general goal of the career should be well-defined. A veterinarian helps animals, a plumber fixes pipes, an architect designs buildings, and so on.

The need for structure is important in careers for people with autism, as is the need to maintain an intense focus on a particular interest.

That’s the key to finding successful careers for people with autism — career choices need to suit their special interests. It’s incredibly common for people with autism for focus on a very narrow field of interest. If they can find a career in that field it’s likely they will end up doing very well.

It’s difficult to recommend specific careers without knowing your child, because there is no one-size-fits-all. The autism spectrum includes individuals with a wide variety of skills and aptitudes.

Those with higher functioning levels of autism tend to have more career options available to them than people with severe ASD, but people on all levels of spectrum are very employable. It’s just a matter of finding the right career for them.

There are a couple of great ways to identify suitable careers for your individual child. One of the ways is with a RIASEC test. A RIASEC test is designed to help children discover which careers are most suitable for them according to their unique abilities, interests, skills, and traits.  

The results of a RIASEC test can be used to help kids and teens develop a plan for courses to take in high school and college that are most conducive to achieving one of the careers they were determined to be a match for.

Another way to identify your child’s skills and abilities are with our games. When a player starts one of our games, they are shown two different images of jobs and/or activities. They are then asked to select which one is more desirable. Based on the player’s choices, our analytics engine generates the RIASEC profile.

The best part about this method is our games are always free for gamers! Sign your child up today for free today and start gaining new insight into which career choices may be right for them.

The RIASEC Test

RIASEC stands for realistic, investigative, artistic, social, enterprising and conventional. A RIASEC test is designed to help children discover which careers are most suitable for them according to their unique abilities, interests, skills, and traits.

The results of a RIASEC test can be used to help kids and teens develop a plan for courses to take in high school and college that are most conducive to achieving one of the careers they were determined to be a match for. 

How a RIASEC Test is Conducted

A RIASEC test is similar to other aptitude tests. It has no time limit, and there are no “right” or “wrong” answers as long as the questions are answered truthfully.

Identifor created a visual approach to administering the RIASEC test.  Instead of using pen-and-paper to rate whether a person like or dislike a task, an Identifor Gamer simply chooses between two tasks.  Based on 30 such comparisons, we are able to code the choices to a list of jobs and careers that are most suitable for that particular child.

A RIASEC test groups the results into six categories based on John Holland’s six types of personality:

  • Realistic: You may do best in mechanical and athletic jobs.
  • Investigative: You like to observe, learn, analyze and solve problems.
  • Artistic: You would like to work in unstructured situations where you can express your creativity.
  • Social: You prefer working with others.
  • Enterprising: Enjoy working with and persuading others.
  • Conventional: You are detail-oriented, organized and like to work with data.

Implications of a RIASEC Test

The RIASEC test helps a person understand how he or she likes to spend their time. At Identifor, we go further to identify the types of jobs that other people with similar RIASEC profiles have found rewarding.

Identifor created a novel approach to enable individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to determine their RIASEC profile without having to use pen-and-paper tests. Instead, they can play computer games!

When a player starts a game, they are shown two different images of jobs and/or activities. They are then asked to select which one is more desirable. Based on the player’s choices, our analytics engine generates the RIASEC profile.

Whether or not your child has completed a traditional RIASEC test before, we ask that you also introduce him or her to our games. Our games are designed to help you identify your child’s skills and abilities in a way that can’t be accomplished through simply writing a test.

Best of all, Identifor is always free for gamers. Sign your child up today for free today and start gaining new insight into your child’s personality.

#AutismChat: Creating A Community of People Touched by Autism

 

autism_chat_revised_1024Identifor is hosting a live Twitter chat about autism this week and we’d love to have you join us! The popularity of our last twitter chat means we already have another one ready for Thursday at 7pm est/ 4pm pst.

We’re expecting a lively discussion amongst people from all walks of life — doctors, medical professionals, those with autism, those on the spectrum, friends and family of those with autism, and the list goes on.

As part of our extended Identifor family, yes you, we’d love to see your face alongside our hashtag #AutismChat on Thursday at 7pm est / 4pm pst.

Knowing what we know about autism, we understand if you’re asking yourself right now, “What is a Twitter chat and why should I be a part of one?”

If you’ve never done something before, it helps to know what kind of benefits you can expect from it. Why should you attend? Frankly, it wouldn’t be much of a chat if you didn’t join us, now would it?

Humor aside, a Twitter chat about autism is an opportunity for you to connect with other like-minded people and discuss topics surrounding autism that are important to them. Our goal is to create a community of people touched by autism.

We typically begin each chat with a list of 8 topics. One by one, we take our time discussing the topics while appending the hashtag #AutismChat at the end of the tweets.

You can easily keep up with the conversation even if you’re not following everyone by using a website that’s designed for Twitter chats. We recommend www.tweetchat.com.

Simply go to that site, enter the hashtag, and click “Yes” when the prompt comes up asking you to authorize your Twitter account. Then you’ll be able to actively participate in the conversation, and maybe make some new friends and connections along the way.

This Week’s Autism Chat

If you weren’t able to make it to last week’s Autism Chat, you can catch up on what you missed here and get a feel for what to expect in this week’s.

Here are some sample topics that we may cover in this week’s chat:  

  • Q1. What have you done to understand your child’s issues and abilities?
  • Q2. Have you received an Individualized Education Plan, or IEP, for your child?
  • Q3. If so, how much did the IEP help you to help your child?
  • Q4. Have you sent an email/letter to your child’s teacher outlining your child’s strengths?
  • Q5. What have you done to build a support system so that you are calm in front of your child?
  • Q6. Have you considered keeping a binder for any bullying/teasing issues that arise with your child?
  • Q7. How do you keep up with new services available to your child?
  • Q8. Have you ever considered being an advocate for special-needs children?

Please keep in mind, especially if you’re new to Twitter chats, that when you’re responding to a specific question it works best if you preface your tweets with A1, A2, A3, etc.

Again, Autism Chat occurs each week on Thursday at 7pm est/ 4pm pst. We look forward to having you join us. If there’s a topic you want to discuss that you don’t see listed, please let us know and we’d be happy to look into using it in future Autism Chats.

Calling for Q&As to “train Abby”

We embarked on creating Identifor to help address 3 needs teens and adults have:

  1. Help identify individuals’ abilities, strengths and interests so that appropriate educational and vocational plans can be pursued to enable fulfilling adult lives.
  2. Help create job opportunities that leverage the strengths of these adults.
  3. Support them 24/7 while they pursue what they are good at and enjoy doing – especially since aides and parents are no longer around to provide support.

We’ve making progress on the first goal through Identifor’s games and Dashboard.

The second goal is a work-in-process.  We’re working on a few things, but not far enough to discuss at this point

The third goal is the reason for this post.

 Abby Personal Coach

Screenshot_2015-08-19-20-17-52We built Identifor using an artificial intelligence-driven avatar (Abby) with the objective of enabling her to help adults address situations that arise over the course of a day – whether that’s at school, on the job, at home, in transit, etc.

We are now taking the next step by creating a mobile app that works on iOS and Android phones and tablets so that Abby can provide constant support over the course of a day.

Rather than explaining in text what we have in mind, let us share a “first peek” at what our developers are working on to show what Abby can do.  Please view this 2-minute video to see how Abby can provide support over the course of a day.

Abby App Demonstration

Abby is only limited by our imagination, and she can address virtually any situation we “train” her to support.

We are making good progress “training Abby,” but we think there’s much more that can be done to address all the situations adults and teens face.  Therefore, we are reaching out to ask for help in creating an exhaustive of situations and questions (and answers) that Abby should address.  We believe direct input from those who can benefit from Abby’s support will enable her to provide the best support for the broader community.

Through the generosity of a donor, Identifor Foundation is launching a contest and prize program for those who contribute questions and answers for Abby by September 4, 2015.  A $1 prize will be given for each submitted question and answer we receive by midnight Eastern Time September 4, 2015.

Please send Q&As directly to Abby at abby@identifor.com.

executive functioning assessment

Executive Functioning Assessment

Executive functioning assessment is important if you suspect your child has executive function deficits. Executive function skills play an important role in your child’s performance in school, so getting these skills identified early will allow your child the ability to strengthen them for future years.

Deficits in executive function skills can lead to your child having difficulties with the following everyday activities of a student:

  • Being organized
  • Starting and completing work
  • Remembering to complete homework on time
  • Memorizing and recalling facts
  • Writing essays or reports
  • Working through math problems
  • Being punctual
  • Managing one’s emotions
  • Finishing long-term projects
  • Planning ahead

Executive functioning assessment is actually a recent phenomenon — so new in fact that there is no standardized procedure. However, that doesn’t mean there aren’t tests available for executive functioning assessment.

There are a variety of tests available, and this article will introduce you to them so you know what to expect during an executive functioning assessment.

Types of Executive Functioning Assessment

Doctor’s Evaluation

Almost invariably, an interview with a doctor will be an integral part of an executive functioning assessment. The interview will be designed to learn about your child’s performance at school and a bit about his or her home life.

Here are some examples of topics you will be asked about during an executive functioning assessment:

  • How does your child organize school work?
  • How does your child organize their academic life?
  • What are your child’s study skills like? Are they able to start and complete school work on their own, without being supervised?
  • How does your child manage their academic projects and assignments? Do they come with all assignments they need to complete, and actually turn in the homework to the teacher?
  • How does your child organize their bedroom, closet, drawers, backpack, desk or locker?
  • Can you recall a time when your child was particularly forgetful? Has your child ever lost his or her property?

You might sense a common theme in this questions, which is organization. These questions are used to determine the level of your child’s internal and external organization.

The examples above refer mainly to external organization, because they can be observed from the outside by parents and teachers.

What’s more difficult to determine is the level of your child’s internal organization. Internal organization can best be observed through your child’s school work. For example, how your child organizes their ideas into an essay, and how he or she uses formulas to solve math problems.

Your child’s organization skills become more observable during the transition from elementary school to middle school, and the transition between middle school and high school.

Each level of schooling comes with increased demands in organization. In addition, the increased complexity in academic materials may make it more difficult for your child to progress through the years.

Formal Examination

Since the idea of executive functioning assessment is so new, few formal examinations have been created. The ones that are available are designed to test your child’s organization skills, working memory, and ability to retrieve long-term memories. No matter what type of executive functioning assessment you end up getting for your child, you can almost surely expect them to examine the same set of skills.

To help identify your child’s some of your child’s executive functioning skills we welcome you to browse through the games on our site. Show them to your child and watch how they interact with the games. Best of all, gaming is always free at Identifor.

multiple intelligences learning styles

Multiple Intelligences and Learning Styles

When it comes to multiple intelligences and learning styles, it’s believed that each learner has a primary learning style, and he or she can be taught how to study in a way that compliments their particular learning style.

In addition, the theory of multiple intelligences and learning styles suggests that people also have a secondary style of learning which can be used to reinforce their primary learning style.

According to studies, students have been proven to learn more effectively when multiple intelligences and learning styles are considered. When educators teach in a way that complements a student’s primary and secondary learning style, that student has the potential to perform better in their studies.

A person’s learning style can be determined through a variety of ways — for a list of resources see https://www.learning-styles-online.com — and once determined can be used as the person’s strength that will enable them to master new and difficult information.

Matching multiple intelligences and learning styles with educational models compatible with an individual’s preferences has been proven to be beneficial to that person’s academic success.

When considering multiple intelligences and learning styles we’re about to go over in this article, keep in mind that at no time are we suggesting one is better than the other.

Instead, what we’re aiming to do with this article is examine how multiple intelligences and learning styles are different and complementary.

When multiple intelligences and learning styles are matched together this can lead to an increase in student learning.

In a book titled “Developing Students’ Multiple Intelligences”, author Kristen Nicholson-Nelson proposed that people who are smart in an intelligence learn best through methods associated with that intelligence.

That being said, here is a list of Howard Gardner’s eight multiple intelligences and complementary learning styles.

List of Howard Gardner’s Eight Multiple Intelligences and Learning Styles

  • Verbal-linguistic: learn best through reading, hearing, and seeing words and speaking, writing, discussing, and debating ideas.
  • Math-logical: learn best through working with patterns and relationships, classifying and categorizing, and working with the abstract.
  • Spatial: learn best in working with pictures and colors, visualizing and using the mind’s eye, and drawing.
  • Bodily-kinesthetic: learn best touching, moving, and processing knowledge through bodily sensation.
  • Musical: learn best with rhythm and melody, singing, and listening to music and melodies.
  • Interpersonal: learn best through sharing, comparing and relating with others, interviewing, and cooperating.
  • Intrapersonal: learn best through working alone, doing self-paced projects, and reflecting.
  • Naturalists: learn best when working in nature, exploring living things, and learning about plants and natural events.

Howard Gardner strongly believes people can develop each of the above multiple intelligences and learning styles to varying degrees. All people are different and have different combinations of the above learning styles, each of which are important.

To help identify your child’s learning style we welcome you to browse through some of the game on our site, all of which have been designed to identify multiple intelligences and learning styles. Show them to your child and watch how they interact with the games. Best of all, gaming is always free at Identifor.

Executive Functioning Strategies

 

Overnight successes are rare in e-commerce.

But an overnight surge in customer service requests?

Yeah, that happens quite a lot.

Before you’re forced to ramp up on customer support software out of necessity, build a strong foundation with these ten basic e-commerce customer service tools.

You don’t need to invest a lot of money—we curated a list of budget-friendly options that can expand as your business grows. And the ROI will more than prove itself in the long-run.

Get proactive by suiting up with this list of the top ten e-commerce customer service tools, personally I fully suggest working with Infusionsoft as your main tool, which is vital to fulfill the most common customer and worker needs..

Let’s be honest. SEO has got a bad reputation. If your company hasn’t already been burnt by a poor SEO campaign then you can bet that you’ll be receiving several calls a day from overseas companies promising to rank you at the toppermost of the poppermost. On top of these worries businesses have other concerns.

‘SEO takes too long and cost too much for my business’

‘Is SEO still relevant in 2018? Can’t I do Facebook advertising instead to get clients?’

‘We’ll never catch up with our competitors’

‘Shall I have sushi for lunch?’

All very valid concerns and questions — go the sushi. You deserve it.

Maybe you have tried to take on the SEO challenge yourself, or perhaps you hired an SEO agency that outsources their work and doesn’t understand the local competitive space (or good SEO practices — Meowww).

While it might seem daunting, your business’s long term survival will depend on your ability to generate high quality leads consistently and SEO is without doubt one of the most effective ways to ensure your pipeline of leads and prospects are consistently full.

Here are 5 reasons why SEO is important and can help skyrocket your business to the next level:

SEO Delivers A High ROI

Yep, Adwords, sponsored social media and re-marketing campaigns can, sometimes, deliver instant ROI, but nothing beats SEO when it comes to delivering high-quality leads on a consistent basis.

Why is SEO the organic magic your business needs?

It boils down to the intent of your prospects. While it is true that immediate advertising costs on social media might be initially cheaper, the prospects you attract there are more likely browsers than actual shoppers actively looking to buy. When someone is actively looking to make a purchase, they will likely search for the specific product or service on Google. They’re savvy to online advertising so they will generally skip straight past the paid ad’s and go to the results that are listed on merit — organic listings.

These are active leads, ready to part with their hard earned money. They need little convincing because they’re looking for what you’re selling and they trust you because your site is ranking well;

If your website has been structured poorly and has a weak SEO rating it won’t be shown in Googles search results. Conversely a site that has been built with SEO in mind and has an ongoing SEO strategy will have more chance of being on page 1 of Googles search results.

 

Your starter pack for e-commerce customer service tools

Each of these tools is simple enough to start using today. And yet, flexible enough to grow with your business. You’ll continue to get value from them ten years (and millions of customers) from now.

e-commerce customer service tools

1. All-in-one helpdesk software

Helpdesk software acts as the foundation for all your support tools. It houses a basic set of tools, like an inbox and reporting dashboard. But it allows for added integrations and more advanced features as you grow.

So instead of purchasing a shared inbox, knowledge base, or reporting tools separately (numbers 2, 3, and 4 on this list), you could just get an all-in-one helpdesk that includes them all.

Some e-commerce store owners prefer to buy one tool at a time, though. For that reason, I’ll list each option separately below (it’s easier to explain each one individually anyway).

But as a customer support expert, I highly recommend getting an all-in-one helpdesk ticketing system rather than one-off solutions. It will increase your ROI and save you the headache of having to switch platforms in the future.

This list was built with growth in mind. Presumably, your e-commerce business was too.

Maybe you only offer email support right now but plan to offer live chat or phone support in the future. A helpdesk will lay the foundation for these multiple channels.

A good helpdesk houses all past, present, and future customer communications in the same place, regardless of how or when they contact you:

  • Social media channels
  • Live chat support
  • Phone support
  • Email support
  • Reviews and rankings
  • Marketing emails
  • Self-service interaction
e-commerce customer service channels
An all-in-one helpdesk like Groove funnels all your customer communications into one platform

Simple helpdesk software (like Groove) is a great starting point for most online businesses. You can optimize your current workflow using basic tools like a shared inbox. Then simply add more advanced integrations as your business grows.

2. Shared inbox

A shared inbox is the most essential tool for e-commerce customer service.

It provides everything you need to organize customer inquiries and enhance productivity:

  • Customer support history
  • Team member assignments
  • Conversation status
  • Internal notes
  • Collision detection
  • Canned replies
  • Rules and automations

Make sure one of the features included is an integration with your e-commerce platform. This enables you to see a complete customer breakdown with information like recent purchases, total spend, total orders, etc.

Here’s a look at the Shopify integration within Groove’s shared inbox:

e-commerce customer service tool integration with Groove helpdesk 
Try Groove for free to view relevant Shopify information while answering support tickets

That said, canned and auto replies will probably be the most immediately useful feature for your business. You can add, edit, and send these saved templates to common questions with just a few clicks:

Groove canned reply 
Try out canned replies for yourself by signing up for a trial of Groove

Shared inboxes offer a ton of features like this to exponentially increase your productivity. You’ll be able to respond to every support ticket without cloning yourself or hiring more people.

3. Knowledge base

A knowledge base empowers prospective customers to make informed purchases by providing detailed answers to a wide range of common questions. After they make a purchase, self-service reduces support volume and increases customer satisfaction.

Why? Because online shoppers genuinely want to help themselves…

e-commerce customers use self-service tools 
Data from 80 Customer Service Statistics: 8 Lessons to Fuel Growth in 2020 and Beyond

The first step is getting a knowledge base (if you use an all-in-one helpdesk like Groove, we include one with every plan). Then, it’s just a matter of adding content, organizing it, and making it easy to search.

e-commerce store knowledge base 
Parabo Press uses Groove’s knowledge base to answer common questions—create your own resource with a free trial

Include all relevant information for your e-commerce store like faqs, delivery options, return policy, etc. Building a solid knowledge base saves both your customers and your own time.

It’s also one of the highest ROI e-commerce customer support tools. By putting up a simple FAQ, you can decrease support volume by 33% and even see millions of dollars in savings in the long-run.

4. Reporting dashboard

From a business-wide perspective, there’s plenty to measure in e-commerce.

In fact, I’ve written extensively about e-commerce customer experience metrics—A guide that (to be honest) almost murdered me during the creation process!

The good news is—if I can master e-commerce customer analytics—anyone can.

The even better news here is we can boil all that down to a handful of customer-related key-performance indicators (KPIs) within your helpdesk.

For e-commerce, you’ll want to track metrics like customer happiness, total conversations per day, and knowledge base performance.