Category Archives: Blog

riasec assessment

RIASEC Assessment: Identify the Ideal Career Choices for Your Child

A RIASEC assessment is one of the starting points for helping students develop an educational plan for high school and college. RIASEC stands for:

  • Realistic
  • Investigative
  • Artistic
  • Social
  • Enterprising
  • Conventional

RIASEC test results can be used to match students up with appropriate career choices, which are determined by their abilities, interests, and traits. Educators can assist with RIASEC test interpretation and put the student on a path toward a career they’re best suited for.

A RIASEC assessment is unlike any other standardized test a student will take throughout their academic life. There are no right or wrong answers, and students can take as long as they need to complete it. The only requirement is that students are as honest as they can be with their answers. This is incredibly important, as being anything less than truthful can lead a student down the wrong career path.

Results from a RIASEC assessment can help identify the ideal types of careers for the individual student, based on John Holland’s six personality types.

  • A ‘realistic’ personality means the student may excel in jobs that require physical labor.  
  • An ‘investigative’ personality means the student may be suited for jobs that require them to analyze and solve problems.
  • An ‘artistic’ personality means the student may excel in a job that allows them to be creative.
  • A ‘social’ personality means the student will likely excel at working as part of a team.
  • An ‘enterprising’ personality means the student may be suited for jobs where they’re the boss.
  • A ‘conventional’ personality indicates the student is detail-oriented, well organized, and enjoys working with data.

Conducting a RIASEC Assessment

A RIASEC assessment doesn’t necessarily have to be conducted at school, or under the supervision of an educator. With the right tools, a RIASEC assessment can be completed from the comfort of the student’s own home.

Identifor has created a unique way to conduct a RIASEC assessment which, believe it or not, involves playing computer games. Identifor‘ s games have been designed to help individuals with autism spectrum disorder identify their RIASEC profile without a typical pencil-and-paper test.

When playing Identifor’s games, players are first presented with images of different types of activities and asked to select which one is more desirable. Based on their choices, and how they interact with the games, Identifor’s analytics engine will generate a RIASEC profile.

In most cases, we find that students with autism spectrum disorder are more likely to stay engaged with Identifor’s games than a pencil-and-paper test. That’s why we encourage you to introduce them to our games, as they can identify your child’s skills and abilities in a way that can’t be accomplished by simply writing a test.

Not sure if this is the right approach for your child? You’ll be happy to know Identifor games are always free to play, so you can see first-hand how they’ll keep your child engaged as you gain valuable insight into their traits and abilities.

Sign up for free, and your child can start playing right away on their computer or mobile device.

interactive learning games

Interactive Learning Games Online for College Students and Adults

A commonly held belief is that online games are a waste of a student’s time. Many believe online games don’t provide any value to a high school student, college student, or adult’s life and only distract from things that are more important. To them, we say you haven’t found the right games.

Not all games are designed purely for entertainment purposes. On the contrary, there are interactive learning games that are designed to complement a student’s education and improve cognitive function. What are also known as brain training games, interactive learning games online are the mental equivalent of regular gym workouts. The brain isn’t exactly a muscle, but it can still be exercised in a similar fashion.

Interactive learning games can improve cognitive functions such as problem-solving, visual discrimination, and working memory. They can also be a means of assessing learning strengths that might apply to future goals.

Just like working out the body can improve physical performance, working out the mind with interactive learning games can improve cognitive performance over time. In this article, we’re going to focus on recommending some of the most accessible interactive educational games for students— the kind they can play on their phones!

In order to get students to play these games regularly, they have to be designed in a way that easily fits into their lifestyle. Since they’re on their phones throughout the day anyway, it takes nothing to open an app and play some interactive learning games for 5-10 minutes a day. Here are 4 of the top apps for learning games that students can play on their iPhones or iPads. These are all “freemium” games— which means they are free to play on a limited basis, but full access requires a paid subscription.

Top 4 Interactive Learning Games for College Students

1. Lumosity

With over 85 million users, Lumosity is the biggest name in interactive learning games for adults and college students. It features over 30 games that are designed to challenge a student’s memory, attention span, problem-solving ability, reaction time, and more. Results are measured on the ‘Lumosity Performance Index’ scale, which provides insight into the student’s abilities and progression over time.

2. Elevate

Elevate focuses on what the individual student wants to get out of using it. For example– maybe the student is already strong in reading and writing but needs to improve their abilities in math and problem-solving. Elevate has a vast selection of games that are geared toward all subjects, and students are provided with a post-test report with insights into their results.

3. Memorado

Memorado is perhaps one of the most relaxing learning games out there. It’s designed with a pretty palette of pastel colors, which is accompanied by a pleasant soundtrack if played with the sound on. Memorado doesn’t offer anything drastically different compared to Lumosity or Elevate, though students may find it more enjoyable to use due to its unique attention to good design.

4. Identifor

We would be remiss not to mention our own mobile app, which can be downloaded for free on both iOS and Android. Unlike other apps on this list, Identifor has been designed specifically for individuals with autism spectrum disorder. Identifor assists individuals with identifying their strengths and abilities. Insights provided by the Identifor app can be used to help develop educational and vocational plans. Identifor has proven to be a valuable tool for students, as well as parents, educators, and clinicians.

Follow these links to download Identifor for iPhone or Android.

activities for autistic teens

Activities for Autistic Teens

Activities for autistic teens are necessary for fostering an environment that will help them nurture and grow specific abilities. Autistic teens learn best through activities that are designed to teach them something specific.

Lessons in a classroom are not enough for autistic teens to learn and develop new abilities. Classroom teachings should be augmented with outside activities in order to help autistic teens learn through practical experience. This will help teens with activities like following their passions, finding like-minded people in social activities, attending clubs and conventions such as Comic-Con, and navigating social media with guidance.

In this article, we will present you with a variety of engaging activities for autistic teens, which can be both fun and educational.

5 Different Activities for Autistic Teens

Computer Games

Contrary to popular belief, not all computer games are bad for teenagers. Carefully chosen games can teach your teen a lot about developing different abilities. For example, studies show that online games for autistic teenagers can help enhance their problem-solving skills.

We recommend choosing educational games that encourage your teen to use logic, such as those found here at Identifor. If your teen prefers to use their phone over a computer, then you can download our companion app to their phone so they can play on the go. All games are designed to develop an autistic teen’s multiple intelligences, and parents can receive an ongoing assessment of their child’s progression.

Puzzles

Puzzles are not just for children. With puzzles designed for all age groups, they can help enhance the cognitive abilities of any individual. Autistic teens, in particular, are visually skilled and tend to enjoy working on puzzles. In addition, the hyper-focus of an autistic teen gives them a natural aptitude for solving puzzles.  Putting together puzzles could either be done as a solo activity or as a social activity with a friend or family member. Encourage your teen to discuss what they’re doing and thinking as they work through the puzzle. Completing puzzles as part of a team effort will help improve your teen’s speech and communication abilities.

Team Activities

Solo activities for an autistic teen should be balanced with team activities because interaction is necessary for developing social abilities. In order to help your teen live a fulfilling social life, they should be encouraged to participate in team activities whenever possible. Be careful not to force them into something they’re not comfortable with, and don’t overwhelm them with too many team activities at once.

Household Chores

It’s important to reinforce concepts like responsibility and sharing with autistic teenagers. One of the best ways for teens to develop a practical understanding of these ideas is by helping out around the house. Developing a sense of responsibility for where one lives is something that will help your teen well into their adult life.

Creative Activities

Autistic teens are wired to think logically, but there’s an imagination deep down that can be developed with creative activities. One of the best ways to break your teen’s pattern of logical thinking is getting them to create something out of nothing. This could include activities like art, crafts, building models, writing stories, playing music, and so on.

Activities for Autistic Teens: In Summary

When it comes to choosing activities for autistic teens, first think about the abilities your teen needs to develop. Pick activities that are geared toward nurturing those abilities. Also consider any possible challenges you may face, such as your teen not taking particularly well to a chosen activity.

Above all, we recommend choosing games and activities that match your teen’s interests. They’ll be much more eager to participate in an activity if it’s in line with what they already like.  As we mentioned, they’ll be able to use these skills to do things like following their passions, finding like-minded people in social activities, and attend clubs and conventions.

We encourage you to start by introducing your son or daughter to Identifor’s unique selection of games, which can provide greater insight into your teen’s cognitive development. For more information about assessing your teen’s abilities, please see our article about the RIASEC test.

how to improve soft skills

How to Improve Soft Skills in Your Autistic Teen

Soft skills are a set of intangible qualities that can determine one’s character, their attitude towards life, and their development of personal relationships with others. Unlike hard skills that can be measured through standardized testing, there is no way to measure soft skills.

However, that doesn’t mean they go unnoticed. When it comes to the workplace, look at it like this: hard skills will get you in the door, but soft skills are the real qualities employers look for. That’s why it’s important for parents to learn how to improve soft skills in their autistic teen

Like hard skills, soft skills can be learned, practiced, and improved upon. This is especially important for individuals with autism, as soft skills are more difficult for them to grasp. They may be able to make sense of the most complicated math problems, but struggle when it comes to workplace etiquette.

In this article, we will go over some tips for how to improve soft skills, which will help ensure your child is ready for the social challenges of the workplace.

Communication Skills

When communicating with others, a lot can be said through non-verbal communication. Show your child how to start interactions off on a positive note by teaching them about eye contact, tone of voice, body proximity, and gestures. It also helps to know how to detect sarcasm. It’s important for autistic teens to be given these communication cues expressively, while also being trained to read them from others in the workplace to get the full communication message

While communicating with your child, pay attention to where their eyes are looking. Remind them eye contact is important, and veering off in another direction can come off as rude. Making eye contact is the first step, the next step is to be an active listener.

The challenge of how to improve listening skills can be met with listening skills games. Try practicing with your child by quizzing them on things you talked about throughout the day. See how well they really listened to what you were saying. Have a reward system in place for getting all the answers right.

Interpersonal Relationships

Since a workplace consists of people all working together to achieve similar goals, the ability to build relationships with other co-workers is key. Collaboration activities and teamwork activities can help improve these skills.

Interpersonal skills can be practiced early on. Encourage your child to arrange study groups with classmates to improve their teamwork abilities. Suggest collaborating with friends on a group activity, such as planning a graduation party.

The challenge of how to improve soft skills can also be met with one-on-one coaching. Create some example scenarios and try role playing so you can see how your child would behave in different social situations. This can include simple scenarios, such as greeting coworkers in the morning and making small talk during lunch, to more complicated interactions such as resolving conflicts.

How to Improve Soft Skills in the Workplace

One of the greatest social challenges your child may face is interacting with potential employers during a job interview. Again, soft skills for a job interview can be improved with one-on-one coaching. Practice with your child by role-playing job interviews.

Critique their responses honestly. This will give them the opportunity to learn another workplace soft skill— accepting feedback. Giving and receiving feedback is a part of day-to-day life in the workplace. The ability to accept feedback and learn from it is a valuable skill for any employee to have.

Self-directed behavior is also highly valued in the workplace. This involves understanding what is expected of them, taking initiative, going the extra mile, and finishing work without having to be reminded. This can also be practiced early on with time management activities. Try assigning tasks to your child for work that needs to be done around the house, along with deadlines for completing the tasks. Bonus points if they take initiative by going above and beyond the assignments.

In Summary

By now you should have plenty of ideas for how to improve soft skills with your child. Believe it or not, another way they can receive soft skills training is through fun activities like computer games. We encourage you to introduce your son or daughter to Identifor’s unique selection of games, which can help improve soft skills such as problem-solving and creative thinking.

life skills for teens

Life Skills for Teens: What Your Child Should Know Before Graduating High School

Life moves fast — it won’t be long before your child is on their way to becoming a young adult. That can be an alarming feeling for both parents and children, but preparing your child with the essential life skills for teens is one way to make sure they can handle the challenges of adulthood.

There’s only so much that children can learn in school, which is geared more toward educating them in various academic subjects than it is about improving life skills for teens with autism. High school can help teens develop study skills for college, but it’s not so effective at helping teens develop skills for everyday life.

Unfortunately, you’re not likely to find any courses for life skills in high school. That means it’s up to the parents to help their children learn how to take care of themselves as they get older.

In this article, we will go over examples of life skills that all teens should acquire before graduating high school.

Examples of Life Skills for Teens

Self Care Skills

Self care skills include everything from hygiene, to personal grooming, to picking out appropriate clothes to wear in the morning. These may be the most important set of skills to learn as they are paramount to living a healthy life. Some of the basic self care skills a teen should have include:

  • – Healthy daily habits such as brushing teeth, showering, washing one’s hair, and so on
  • – How to keep their environment clean and organized
  • – Picking out clothes and matching outfits together
  • – Choosing appropriate clothes for different occasions
  • – Eating a healthy, balanced diet
  • – Knowing how to take care of themselves in the event of common illnesses, such as colds or the flu
  • – What to do in medical emergencies
  • – Knowing which over-the-counter medication to take in non-emergency situations

Domestic Skills

Domestic skills include everything involved in maintaining a proper home life. These basic home management skills are something every teen should learn early on:

  • – Knowing the steps involved to getting their own house or apartment
  • – How to take care of their own place and keep it clean — vacuuming, dusting, washing dishes, doing laundry, taking out the garbage, etc.
  • – Paying bills on time
  • – Simple repairs
  • – Doing groceries
  • – Preparing meals

Money Management Skills

Money management skills are vital in so many aspects of life. Being financially literate can help your child live comfortably as they get older, while staying out of debt and keeping up with various payments. You can improve your child’s money management skills by helping them learn how to:

  • – Make a budget and stick to it
  • – Open a bank account and apply for a credit card
  • – Use a credit card responsibly, which involves learning how interest works and how to stay debt-free
  • – Save money for emergencies
  • – Plan for retirement
  • – Maintain accurate financial records

Interpersonal Skills

Communication skills in the workplace, and in personal life, are key to getting along with others. Making your child aware of appropriate manners for different social situations will help ensure they’re not singled out for being rude or disrespectful. Examples of interpersonal skills include:

  • – Developing and maintaining friendships
  • – Valuing and nurturing personal relationships
  • – Maintaining a healthy relationship with family members
  • – Basic etiquette
  • – Showing respect to people who share different views or beliefs
  • – Understanding non-verbal cues
  • – Empathizing with others
  • – Actively listening to others when they talk, rather than waiting for a turn to speak
  • – How to apologize and take responsibility
  • – Knowing when to ask for help

More Information

For more information about essential life skills every autistic teen should learn, please see our article on keys to independent living for autistic adults.

autistic adults

How to Provide Support for Adults With Autism

Transitioning into adulthood is not easy for anyone, so you can expect it to be especially challenging for autistic adults.  

However, with the right resources for autistic adults, you can help prepare them for what they will be up against.

With preparation comes success, so let’s get right into it. Here’s how to provide support for adults with autism.

Alternate Paths for Adults With Autism

We previously wrote an article about transitioning to an adult as a college-bound student. This article will deal with other routes a young adult might take after high school.

For example, some autistic adults may enter the workforce directly after high school. Others may go on to live on their own via assisted living programs.

There are other paths an adult with autism may take after high school, which is why this article will discuss tips for adults who are not college-bound.

Tips for Independent Living for Autistic Adults

While these tips are geared towards providing support for adults with autism, virtually anyone reading this can benefit from following the same advice.

Turn Obsessive Interests into Useful Abilities

One way for an adult with autism to find a career they will both enjoy and excel at is to turn obsessive interests into abilities that can help others.

An autistic adult who is enamored with photography could start a freelance photography business. Another autistic adult who obsessively micromanages their money could get a job in finance — and so on.

Learn Basic Work Abilities

It’s important for autistic adults to learn the basics of going to work before entering the workforce. This is something parents and educators can help with as well.

There are some unwritten rules we all follow at work, which need to be explicitly written out to autistic adults. Here are some examples:

  • Get to work on time and maintain a strict schedule
  • Good manners like “please” and “thank you” go a long way
  • Develop good grooming and self-care abilities. Always go to work looking your best
  • If you don’t understand something, ask for clarification
  • Show respect, be humble, and be willing to work your way up
  • Be friendly and get along with coworkers, but try to stay away from constantly discussing your special interests
  • Try new things because they could lead to new opportunities

As you can see, everyone can benefit from developing these habits at work, but it’s especially important to make these things clear to adults with autism.

Tips for Parents and Educators

Abilities and habits developed early in life can follow you into adulthood. With that said, there is much that parents and educators can do to help adults with autism prepare for independent living.

Understand that people with autism often have uneven developments. They may be gifted in math but have poor drawing abilities, for example. Determine what an individual’s strengths are and nurture them.

If a child or young adult with autism enjoys doing things like playing video games, browsing the web, or watching TV — try to limit those activities and encourage something more productive.

Instead, turn those idle activities into opportunities to develop new abilities. If the individual enjoys being on the web, encourage them to learn how to build a website or how to program an app.

Support for Adults With Autism: Conclusion

The key to providing support for adults with autism is to help prepare them before, not when, they reach adulthood. For more information please see our other resources, including:

what is a companion app

What is a Companion App? How Can it Help People With Autism?

An intelligent personal assistant that never leaves your side — that’s what a companion app is.

Literally speaking, a companion app is a smartphone application, but it’s so much more than that to the person using it.

Just like a real-life companion, a virtual companion makes you a better version of yourself. It can help you get more done, stick to schedules, and learn about you as you interact with it.

Since our smartphones never leave our side, you can always count on a companion app to be there.

In this article we will discuss more about what you can do with a companion app, and point you in the direction of the best one for people with special needs.

What is a Companion App? Something Like Siri?

When describing what a companion app is, naturally you might think of Siri or other such virtual assistants.

Siri on iPhone, and Google Assistant on Android, do not exactly fit the description of what is a companion app.

Compared to a true companion app, smartphone virtual assistants as we know them today are actually quite limited.

Smartphone virtual assistants typically rely on other apps to accomplish tasks. If you ask Siri to set a reminder it will call upon the Reminders app, if you ask it a question it will conduct a Google search, and so on.

With a companion app everything is done in one place. You’ll never lose track of which app does what, or where to find a piece of information, because you only need to refer to your companion app.

What Does a Companion App Do?

The goal of a companion app is to help you achieve greater independence as the app helps you with the many challenges of everyday life. This could include remembering course schedules, getting to work on time, navigating from one place to another, and so on.

Both students and adults can benefit from companion apps. Here’s what the average day in life with a companion app might look like:

  • Wake up with an alarm
  • Check the calendar to see if you work today
  • Get alerted about today’s weather and find out you might need an umbrella
  • Be reminded to take your morning meds
  • Use the integrated navigation to get to your new job
  • Set reminders for your breaks at work — you don’t want to stay on break too long
  • Cook something new for dinner by asking the companion app how to do it
  • Be reminded to take your evening meds

Those are just a few of the many things you can do with a companion app throughout the day.

What Companion App Should I Use?

Identifor has developed an appropriately named app called ‘Companion’ that is designed to do everything mentioned above and more. It is the only companion app designed for teens and adults with autism.

What really sets Companion apart from similar apps is the artificial intelligence avatar, named Abby, who lives inside the app.

Abby provides a human connection not offered by other apps, and we believe you’ll enjoy having back and forth conversations with your new companion.

‘Companion’ is everything a companion app should be. Click here to download it for iOS.

independent living for autistic adults

Keys to Independent Living for Autistic Adults

In order to ensure a successful transition into adulthood, teens must learn the keys to independent living for autistic adults.

Since these skills are not typically taught in high school, you must take some time with your child to help them learn independent living skills outside of the classroom.

Daily living skills, also known as adaptive skills, must be practiced by individuals with autism before they reach adulthood. This can include anything from grooming skills to learning how to travel to appointments on their own, to doing laundry and preparing meals.

Parents may overlook adaptive skills in favor of academic and behavior management skills. Daily living skills are no less important than other skills, and even an autistic individual with above-average intelligence may have difficulty learning those skills on their own.

In fact, there’s even a study that shows difficulties with adaptive skills may be especially evident in autistic teens with high intelligence. That’s why it’s of the utmost importance for them to learn these skills before they transition into adulthood.

Learning Daily Living Skills

One of the most effective ways for autistic adults to learn independent living skills is to start with small tasks. Let’s look at cooking a meal, for example.

As a child, they can be taught how to gather ingredients for a meal from the fridge and kitchen cupboards. As they get older, you can have them cook meals with you. Eventually, they can practice cooking a full meal on their own from beginning to end.

Real life practice is the key to independent living for autistic adults. It cannot be assumed they will be able to learn how to imitate skills by watching others.

Setting a larger goal to work toward also helps. Something that will incorporate multiple daily living skills they have learned.

As an autistic young adult enters the later years of high school, there are many opportunities for them to practice the daily living skills they’ve learned up to that point.

Going to the mall on their own to pick out new clothes and school supplies, getting a fresh haircut, making their own lunches, joining a social group and making new friends are all different ways a young adult can practice independent living skills.

Social and Relationship Skills

In addition to learning daily living skills, it’s also important to learn how to build meaningful relationships with others. Social and relationship skills are incredibly complex for individuals with autism.

Everything from the norms and expectations of social interactions, to what it means to be in a romantic relationship, should be learned before transitioning into adulthood.

It’s also beneficial if social and independent living skills to support transition into adulthood are part of a transition IEP. Then they can be worked on at school, in the home, and in the community.

Preparing for Independent Living for Autistic Adults

Learning independent living skills means little without having the person actually perform those skills. Teaching your child how to do laundry, and then doing their laundry for them, will not adequately prepare them for independent living.

After taking time to help them learn about daily living skills, try assigning one week out of the month for your child to practice these skills when you feel they’re ready.

During this week have your child do their own laundry, cook all their own meals, get to and from places on their own, and so on. From there you can better gauge how well prepared they are for independent living.

If your child needs further assistance, which they almost surely will after their first week of independent living, they will be able to ask you for the help they need before going off to live on their own.

Conclusion

The key to independent living for autistic adults is helping them learn the skills before, not when, they reach adulthood. For more information please see our other resources, including:

transition planning for students with autism

Transition Planning For Students With Autism: Achieving Success on the Spectrum

Transition planning for students with autism is a requirement of any Individual Education Program (IEP). A transition plan is typically created in the form of a chart, which outlines annual goals and specific responsibilities of the student.

This article will explain what a transition plan is, and discuss some of the common types of transition plans that are created for autistic students.

What is Transition Planning for Students With Autism?

A transition plan is a list of goals to be completed as a student goes through major changes in their life. Each goal included in a transition plan for autism should have a timeline for when the goal is expected to be achieved. Some goals may take one month, 6 months, or even the entire year to complete.

Creating Goals for Success in School and Daily Life

Transition plans are designed to help the student be successful in school, and in everyday life while living with autism. Developing a transition plan is a team effort, with team members consisting of the student, teachers, special education teachers, educational workers, administrators, and parents/guardians.

Creation of a transition plan for autism can begin at any point in the student’s life, but it isn’t implemented until the student turns 14. That’s around the age when a student transitions from elementary school to secondary school – one of the greatest challenges an autistic individual may face up to that point in their lives.

Transition Planning for Students With Autism: Success in School

Academic Goals

School-related transitions addressed in a transition plan for autism will vary depending on the student’s age. The first major transition is commonly transitioning from grade 8 to grade 9, which usually involves transitioning to a new school as well.

As the student grows older, common transitions will include graduating from high school and moving on to college or university. From there, one of the final transitions in a student’s individual education program would be graduating college or university and entering the workforce.

Social Goals

Transition planning for students with autism can include social goals as well. Getting comfortable with asking teachers for help, learning how to socialize and make friends with classmates, and taking part in team sports are examples of common social goals.

Extra-curricular Goals

Transition plans are created for a full calendar year. Since an academic year does not span a full calendar year, a transition plan should also include goals for the student to achieve during summer break. These could include anything from learning how to play an instrument, to reading books that will prepare them for the next year, or vacationing to a place they’ve never been before.

A transition plan can be revised at any point in the student’s life if their needs change. For example, career goals and interests may change, which would require transitioning to a new education plan. If a student decides to drop a class, that would require an adjustment to their transition plan as well.

Conclusion

Transition planning for students with autism is designed to help students cope with major changes in their life. A transition plan needs to include specific goals to achieve throughout the year, along with steps, deadlines, and strategies for achieving each goal. It may sound like a lot of work, but don’t worry – transition plans are created with the help of a team.

As the starting point of a transition plan, it’s recommended that you identify a student’s talents and strengths, which will help with selecting ideal classes for high school.

Identifying strengths and weaknesses in a student’s multiple intelligences can help guide you toward the areas that need the most attention when developing a transition plan. The same can be said for students that exhibit issues with executive functioning.

The most fun and engaging way to identify talents and strengths is to have them try some of our free games, which explore the full range of a child’s multiple intelligences and executive functioning skills.

autism help for parents

Autism Help for Parents

It’s a natural reaction to seek help once learning your child has autism. The news doesn’t have to be life-changing. With the right autism help for parents, it’s possible to maintain a strong connection with your child and relate to them on their level.  

Symptoms of autism are usually observed before the age of 3. They are characterized by great difficulties grasping social skills, ranging from mild to severe. You may initially believe that having a child with autism may cause some disruption or difficulty to your life. However, with autism help for parents, it doesn’t have to be a challenge to raise your child.

In this post, we will go over some of our best tips and provide as much autism help for parents as we can.

Top 3 Tips: Autism Help for Parents

Educate Yourself About Autism
The best way to prepare for anything is to educate yourself about what’s to come. Learning all you can about autism will help you better understand why your child is behaving the way they are. The number one thing to know is that a child is either born with autism or without it.

There’s no way to “catch” autism while growing up if you weren’t born with it. That being said, signs and symptoms may not be observed until a few years into the child’s life. At that point is when you may want to start educating yourself about autism so you’re prepared for how to handle it when parenting your child.

The earlier you know about your child having autism, the earlier you can educate yourself and seek treatment. Early diagnosis, intervention, and treatment are crucial to helping autistic children reach their full potential.

Seek Support From Others
Trust us, you’re not the only one seeking autism help for parents. Helping each other through the process can help significantly. Parenting an autistic child can feel isolated due to the lack of social interaction. Building a social network is going to be important for you during this time.

Think you already have enough support in place? Here’s a checklist that makes up a strong social network for a parent with an autistic child:

  • Emotional Support: Do you have a close friend or family member who you can trust with your most personal feelings and concerns?
  • Social Support: Do you have a friend or colleague you enjoy spending leisure time with?
  • Informational Support: Are you asking your child’s doctor, teachers, therapists, or other caregivers for advice when you need it?
  • Practical Support: Do you have a neighbor or close friend who will help you out at a moment’s notice?

In addition to these individual support types, you may also seek help from social groups. Look into local parent groups for families of children with autism. If needed, ask your child’s doctor for a referral. It also helps to join online Facebook groups if you can’t make it to a group in person. The stronger your support network is, the more confident you will feel knowing your child can get the support he or she deserves.

Learn About Your Child’s Strengths
While children with autism have characteristically poor social skills, they are more than likely to make up for it in other areas. Do you know what your child’s strengths are? What he or she excels at? If not, we know there’s a hidden strength yet to be uncovered.

In order to identify a child’s strengths, we have developed a series of games which can provide you with insight into which of the 8 multiple intelligences your child is particularly strong in. The games are always free to play, and if your child enjoys them we encourage you to sign up for the complete insight into your child’s behavior. Try our games for free here.