independent living for autistic adults

Keys to Independent Living for Autistic Adults

In order to ensure a successful transition into adulthood, teens must learn the keys to independent living for autistic adults.

Since these skills are not typically taught in high school, you must take some time with your child to help them learn independent living skills outside of the classroom.

Daily living skills, also known as adaptive skills, must be practiced by individuals with autism before they reach adulthood. This can include anything from grooming skills, to learning how to travel to appointments on their own, to doing laundry and preparing meals.

Parents may overlook adaptive skills in favor of academic and behavior management skills. Daily living skills are no less important than other skills, and even an autistic individual with above-average intelligence may have difficulty learning those skills on their own.

In fact, there’s even a study that shows difficulties with adaptive skills may be especially evident in autistic teens with high intelligence. That’s why it’s of the utmost importance for them to learn these skills before they transition into adulthood.

Learning Daily Living Skills

One of the most effective ways for autistic adults to learn independent living skills is to start with small tasks. Let’s look at cooking a meal, for example.

As a child, they can be taught how to gather ingredients for a meal from the fridge and kitchen cupboards. As they get older, you can have them cook meals with you. Eventually they can practice cooking a full meal on their own from beginning to end.

Real life practice is the key to independent living for autistic adults. It cannot be assumed they will be able to learn how to imitate skills by watching others.

Setting a larger goal to work toward also helps. Something that will incorporate multiple daily living skills they have learned.

As an autistic young adult enters the later years of high school, there are many opportunity for them to practice the daily living skills they’ve learned up to that point.

Going to the mall on their own to pick out new clothes and school supplies, getting a fresh haircut, making their own lunches, joining a social group and making new friends are all different ways a young adult can practice independent living skills.

Social and Relationship Skills

In addition to learning daily living skills, it’s also important to learn how to build meaningful relationships with others. Social and relationship skills are incredibly complex for individuals with autism.

Everything from the norms and expectations of social interactions, to what it means to be in a romantic relationship, should be learned before transitioning into adulthood.

It’s also beneficial if social and independent living skills to support transition into adulthood are part of a transition IEP. Then they can be worked on at school, in the home, and in the community.

Preparing for Independent Living for Autistic Adults

Learning independent living skills means little without having the person actually perform those skills. Teaching your child how to do laundry, and then doing their laundry for them, will not adequately prepare them for independent living.

After taking time to help them learn about daily living skills, try assigning one week out of the month for your child to practice these skills when you feel they’re ready.

During this week have your child do their own laundry, cook all their own meals, get to and from places on their own, and so on. From there you can better gauge how well prepared they are for independent living.

If your child needs further assistance, which they almost surely will after their first week of independent living, they will be able to ask you for the help they need before going off to live on their own.

Conclusion

The key to independent living for autistic adults is helping them learn the skills before, not when, they reach adulthood. For more information please see our other resources, including:

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Transition Planning For Students With Autism: Achieving Success on the Spectrum

Transition planning for students with autism is a requirement of any Individual Education Program (IEP). A transition plan is typically created in the form of a chart, which outlines annual goals and specific responsibilities of the student.

This article will explain what a transition plan is, and discuss some of the common types of transition plans that are created for autistic students.

What is Transition Planning for Students With Autism?

A transition plan is a list of goals to be completed as a student goes through major changes in their life. Each goal included in a transition plan for autism should have a timeline for when the goal is expected to be achieved. Some goals may take one month, 6 months, or even the entire year to complete.

Creating Goals for Success in School and Daily Life

Transition plans are designed to help the student be successful in school, and in everyday life, while living with autism. Developing a transition plan is a team effort, with team members consisting of the student, teachers, special education teachers, educational workers, administrators, and parents/guardians.

Creation of a transition plan for autism can begin at any point in the student’s life, but it isn’t implemented until the student turns 14. That’s around the age when a student transitions from elementary school to secondary school – one of the greatest challenges an autistic individual may face up to that point in their lives.

Transition Planning for Students With Autism: Success in School

Academic Goals

School-related transitions addressed in a transition plan for autism will vary depending on the student’s age. The first major transition is commonly transitioning from grade 8 to grade 9, which usually involves transitioning to a new school as well.

As the student grows older, common transitions will include graduating from high school and moving on to college or university. From there, one of the final transitions in a student’s individual education program would be graduating college or university and entering the workforce.

Social Goals

Transition planning for students with autism can include social goals as well. Getting comfortable with asking teachers for help, learning how to socialize and make friends with classmates, and taking part in team sports are examples of common social goals.

Extra-curricular Goals

Transition plans are created for a full calendar year. Since an academic year does not span a full calendar year, a transition plan should also include goals for the student to achieve during summer break. These could include anything from learning how to play an instrument, to reading books that will prepare them for the next year, or vacationing to a place they’ve never been before.

A transition plan can be revised at any point in the student’s life if their needs change. For example, career goals and interests may change, which would require transitioning to a new education plan. If a student decides to drop a class, that would require an adjustment to their transition plan as well.

Conclusion

Transition planning for students with autism is designed to help students cope with major changes in their life. A transition plan needs to include specific goals to achieve throughout the year, along with steps, deadlines, and strategies for achieving each goal. It may sound like a lot of work, but don’t worry – transition plans are created with the help of a team.

As the starting point of a transition plan, it’s recommended that you identify a student’s talents and strengths, which will help with selecting ideal classes for high school.

Identifying strengths and weaknesses in a student’s multiple intelligences can help guide you toward the areas that need the most attention when developing a transition plan. The same can be said for students that exhibit issues with executive functioning.

The most fun and engaging way to identify talents and strengths is to have them try some of our free games, which explore the full range of a child’s multiple intelligences and executive functioning skills.

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Autism Help for Parents

It’s a natural reaction to seek help once learning your child has autism. The news doesn’t have to be life-changing. With the right autism help for parents it’s possible to maintain a strong connection with your child and relate to them on their level.  

Symptoms of autism are usually observed before the age of 3. They are characterized by great difficulties grasping social skills, ranging from mild to severe. You may initially believe that having a child with autism may cause some disruption or difficulty to your life. However, with autism help for parents it doesn’t have to be a challenge to raise your child.

In this post we will go over some of our best tips and provide as much autism help for parents as we can.

Top 3 Tips: Autism Help for Parents

Educate Yourself About Autism
The best way to prepare for anything is to educate yourself about what’s to come. Learning all you can about autism will help you better understand why your child is behaving the way they are. The number one thing to know is that a child is either born with autism or without it.

There’s no way to “catch” autism while growing up if you weren’t born with it. That being said, signs and symptoms may not be observed until a few years into the child’s life. At that point is when you may want to start educating yourself about autism so you’re prepared for how to handle it when parenting your child.

The earlier you know about your child having autism, the earlier you can educate yourself and seek treatment. Early diagnosis, intervention, and treatment are crucial to helping autistic children reach their full potential.

Seek Support From Others
Trust us, you’re not the only one seeking autism help for parents. Helping each other through the process can help significantly. Parenting an autistic child can feel isolating due to the lack of social interaction. Building a social network is going to be important for you during this time.

Think you already have enough support in place? Here’s a checklist that make up a strong social network for a parent with an autistic child:

  • Emotional Support: Do you have a close friend or family member who you can trust with your most personal feelings and concerns?
  • Social Support: Do you have a friend or colleague you enjoy spending leisure time with?
  • Informational Support: Are you asking your child’s doctor, teachers, therapists, or other caregivers for advice when you need it?
  • Practical Support: Do you have a neighbor or close friend who will help you out in a moment’s notice?

In addition to these individual support types, you may also seek help from social groups. Look into local parent groups for families of children with autism. If needed, ask your child’s doctor for a referral. It also helps to join online Facebook groups if you can’t make it to a group in person. The stronger your support network is, the more confident you will feel knowing your child can get the support he or she deserves.

Learn About Your Child’s Strengths
While children with autism have characteristically poor social skills, they are more than likely to make up for it in other areas. Do you know what your child’s strengths are? What he or she excels at? If not, we know there’s a hidden strength yet to be uncovered.

In order to identify a child’s strengths we have developed a series of games which can provide you with insight into which of the 8 multiple intelligences your child is particularly strong in. The games are always free to play, and if your child enjoys them we encourage you to sign up for the complete insight into your child’s behavior. Try our games for free here.

naturalistic learner

Naturalistic Learner

Part 8 of 8 in our Blog Series on Howard Gardner’s Theory of Multiple Intelligences

A naturalistic learner is one of the eight unique learning styles according to Howard Gardner’s theory of multiple intelligences. A learning style reflects how an individual approaches learning based on their strengths, weaknesses, and preferences.

Since Howard Gardner published his book Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligence in 1983, he has since clarified that multiple intelligences are NOT learning styles, but rather a model of human intelligences that work together.

With that being said, let’s discuss the unique characteristics of the naturalistic learner.

Characteristics of a Naturalistic Learner

Those with the naturalistic learning style have an uncanny ability to make observations and distinctions about nature. For example, they can easily tell you the difference between one plant and another, the names of different cloud formations, and so on.

Naturalistic learners share a few similarities with kinesthetic learners in the sense that they thrive on holding and touching things. They don’t want to just learn about nature, they want to literally dig in and get their hands dirty. They love being outdoors and have a strong preference for hands-on experiences.

Teaching a Naturalistic Learner

Naturalistic learners are able to learn especially well when working outdoors with nature. They have a natural interest plants, animals, natural events, weather, and so on. As a result, they tend to excel in science and become an active member of their school on issues related to the environment.

In the perfect world of a naturalistic learner, every lesson would be taught outdoors. Of course, that’s just not possible, but that’s not to say they aren’t perfectly capable of learning in a classroom environment as well.

  • Stimulating activities: The key is to make the teacher aware of your child’s learning style, and more often than not they will be happy to accommodate however they can. This could mean incorporating more rich, valuable lessons geared toward their learning style, or some extra credit projects on subjects the child is particularly fond of.
  • Hands-on Activities: When teaching subjects geared toward naturalistic learners it helps if each lesson can be as hands-on as possible. For example, during geology lessons you could bring in samples of rocks and minerals to study. Another potential lesson could involve going around collecting insects and soil samples, and later examining them using a microscope.
  • Reports: As much as a naturalistic learner loves to explore and discover new things about nature, they are equally as interested in reporting on their findings. This presents an opportunity for you to assist them in areas where they’re not so inclined to learn on their own. For example, you can have your child improve his or her english skills by writing up reports or keeping logs on their findings in nature.
  • Books: Another way to assist your child is to encourage them to read books about nature or natural events. This will improve their reading, writing, and critical thinking skills — all while indulging in the subject they love most.

Use these tips to help your child excel in school by learning in a way where they feel most comfortable. If you would like to learn more about your child’s learning style, we encourage you to have them try some of our free games which explore the full range of a child’s multiple intelligences.

The theory of multiple intelligences was developed in 1983 by Dr. Howard Gardner, professor of education at Harvard University. It suggests that the traditional notion of intelligence, based on IQ testing, is far too limited. Instead, Dr. Gardner proposes eight different intelligences to account for a broader range of human potential in children and adults.

This is part 8 in our blog series covering all 8 of Howard Gardner’s proposed 8 intelligences. Click here to view Part 7.

iep transition goals

IEP Transition Goals: Preparing Your Teenager to be a Young Adult

Preparing for life as a young adult is challenging for any high school student — which couldn’t be more true for students with an Individualized Education Program (IEP). That’s why transition plans are accessible to all students with an IEP.

Transition plans help teenagers prepare for young adulthood not just in terms of education, but life in general. They involve setting IEP transition goals based on career and life aspirations, defining the activities necessary to reach those goals, and connecting the student with any necessary resources and services along the way.

In this article we will explain more about what transition plans are, what’s involved in setting IEP transition goals, and provide advice on how to create an effective plan for a successful transition into young adulthood.

What is An IEP Transition Plan

A transition plan is a requirement of a student’s IEP, as defined by the Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA). Law requires that students with an IEP are entitled to transition planning services as part of the first IEP that goes into effect when the student turns 16.

While a transition plan is required to go into effect no later than the age of 16, the planning process can begin much earlier than that. The student and the IEP team can begin working together on building the plan when the student is 15, 14, or whenever is deemed necessary.

The purpose of creating IEP transition goals is to ensure the teen’s final high school years are relevant to the their future plans. The student and the IEP team will set postsecondary goals based on the teen’s aptitudes, abilities, and personal goals for their life after high school.

Parents and teens are very much involved in the process of creating the transition plan. In fact, with the goal being to prepare a teen to become an independent young adult, the child will be encouraged to play a leading role in the development of their transition plan.

Transition plans are an ongoing process. That means progress toward achieving IEP transition goals will be monitored. Data will be collected and assessments will be made which could lead to adjustments to the plan.

Setting IEP Transition Goals

Setting measurable, realistic, and attainable transition goals starts with focusing on a student’s strengths and talents, and figuring out what they want to do with those after high school. Goals should also be designed to teach a student more about independent living skills.

It helps to start by setting a career goal, and then working backward to figure out what the student will need to get there. This can include postsecondary training, required high school courses, supports needed along the way, etc.

As part of setting transition goals, it’s also a requirement to list which services are required to help the child reach those goals. Specific transition planning programs students can participate in will vary depending on your county and school district.

We’ll provide you with some examples, but for exact information on the types of transition programs available in your area check with your Department of Education.

Examples of Transition Planning Programs

  • School-to-Work: This program prepares students with disabilities for obtaining employment. This can include learning how to find a job, how to interview for a job, how to keep a job, and so on.
  • Internships: Through internships at participating employers, students may be able to obtain practical on-the-job skills.
  • Transition Partnership Project: This program provides students with the service coordination, job development, and job coaching required to obtain paid employment related to a specific goal.
  • Adult Transition Programs: These are offered to students over the age of 17 and emphasize teaching the student more about independent living and being self-sufficient.

Other resources may include local youth employment programs, summer jobs for youth programs, and local vocational centers offering training for specific occupations.

Assisting Your Child With IEP Transition Goals

In addition to the services and programs your child is entitled to have access to, there are a number of things you as a parent can do to help your child transition into adulthood.

For example, assigning weekly chores and daily responsibilities can help prepare your child for living independently. As a parent you can also teach your child how to manage money, how to cook their own meals, how to schedule their time and keep appointments, how to get from point A to point B, and so on.

Encourage your child to network with older relatives to learn more about their careers. If and when your child has a career goal in mind, look into visiting potential colleges and workplaces.

Conclusion

IEP transition goals should be designed to create a concrete action plan for postsecondary success in school and day-to-day life. If you would like to learn more about your child’s talents and strengths as the starting point for their IEP transition plan, we encourage you to have them try some of our free games which explore the full range of a child’s multiple intelligences.

verbal linguistic learner

Verbal-Linguistic Learner

Part 7 of 8 in our Blog Series on Howard Gardner’s Theory of Multiple Intelligences

Verbal linguistic learning style is contained in Howard Gardner’s theory of Multiple Intelligences as one of the 8 different learning styles. Those who have this learning style excel at reasoning, solving problems, and learning using language.

The verbal-linguistic learner prefers a style that involves both the written and spoken word. Those who have this learning style find it easy to express themselves, both verbally and in the written form. Simply put, they love reading and writing.

They would rather solve a math word problem than solve an equation. Math isn’t really their thing anyway though, they would much rather be absorbed in a written project, speech and drama classes, debates, journalism, and language classes.

A verbal-linguistic learner likes to eat up words in all of their many uses, such as in tongue twisters, rhymes, and limericks. This type of learner digs deep beneath the surface to discover the meaning of many words, and are obsessed with learning new words to add to their vocabulary.

This type of learner is naturally fascinated by words and language, so even if a verbal-linguistic learner is not being pushed hard enough in school you can find them pushing themselves in other ways. Usually in the form of poetry or songwriting.

One of the traits of this type of learner is using recently learned words and phrases they have picked up, in conversations with others. They are good listeners and have a great ear for picking up and recalling new information, especially if that new information has to do with words.

Teaching a Verbal-Linguistic Learner

  • Make Everything More Verbal: If you are teaching a verbal-linguistic learner, you should only be using techniques that involve written or verbal communication. Whenever possible, find ways to add more speaking and writing when performing routine techniques. 
  • Show and Tell: If you’re showing a verbal-linguistic learner how to do something, it would help them if you talked yourself through the various steps; including what you’re doing, why you’re doing it, and why it is being done in that order.
  • Understand Their Learning Style: The number one thing you can do as a teacher is take the time to understand each individual child’s learning style. As a result, he or she may have some career options in mind that are different from what you had envisioned.
  • Potential Career Choices: Verbal-linguistic learners are naturally drawn to the following types of careers:
    • English teacher
    • Professional writer
    • News correspondent
    • Attorney
    • Publicist
    • Advertising agent
    • Psychologist
    • Speech pathologist
    • Editorial

Could you see your child in any of the above careers? With their type of learning style and natural ability to excel at reading and writing, they’re already at a natural competitive advantage.

Use these tips to help your child excel in school by learning in a way where they feel most comfortable. If you would like to learn more about your child’s learning style, we encourage you to have them try some of our free games which explores the full range of a child’s multiple intelligences.

The theory of multiple intelligences was developed in 1983 by Dr. Howard Gardner, professor of education at Harvard University. It suggests that the traditional notion of intelligence, based on IQ testing, is far too limited. Instead, Dr. Gardner proposes eight different intelligences to account for a broader range of human potential in children and adults.

This is part 7 in our blog series covering all 8 of Howard Gardner’s proposed 8 intelligences. Click here to view Part 6.

musical learner

Musical Learner

Part 6 of 8 in our Blog Series on Howard Gardner’s Theory of Multiple Intelligences.

A musical learner may also be referred to as an aural learner, or an auditory-musical-rhythmic learner. Individuals with this learning style prefer to work with sound and music; they have a natural aptitude for pitch and rhythm.

Singing and/or playing an instrument comes easy to a musical learner. They can also pick out sounds and musical pieces that their peers might not. This includes the sound of different instruments, and background music being played in movies or TV shows.

Musical learners excel in the type of setting where they can hear music, but also hear the relationship and patterns between those sounds.

Music is constantly on the mind of a musical learner, to the point that you can often find them humming or tapping along to a jingle in their head. Try as they might, having songs and jingles stuck in the head of a music learner is unavoidable — they pop into the individual’s head without being prompted.

Motivations of a Musical Learner

Individuals with an auditory learning style have a strong desire to work in the field of music as a career choice. This could include playing music, conducting music, composing music, or audio engineering in a sound studio.

When it comes to learning new information, musical learners utilize sound, rhyme, and music as a means of association and visualization. That’s because sound recordings provide background info about the subject, as well as help to facilitate visualization.

For example, if the individual is motivated to become a music conductor, listening to live orchestral recordings on a headset can be used to create visualizations. It can also strengthen the association in the person’s mind between a music conductor and orchestral music pieces.

Music itself can also be a motivator. Music evokes all kinds of mental states in people, not just musical learners. Music can make you feel happy, sad, angry, energized, or ready to chill out. Auditory learners should make note of which songs make them feel energized, and play them back when they need that extra boost of motivation.

Use your child’s fascination with music to their advantage. You know some people turn information into an acronym to help them remember it better? Such as “ROY G BIV”, which represents all the colors of the rainbow in that order. Well musical learners can follow the same kind of idea, except turn the information into a musical chant. Then all they have to do is sing the chant back to themselves to recall the information.

Teaching a Musical Learner

Just as it is important to know what you can to do help musical learners, it’s just as important to know what to avoid. Here are some helpful tips:  

  • Avoid quiet environments: Avoiding putting musical learners in a completely quiet environment. When in a room that’s devoid of sound, the individual will eventually begin to create their own by humming or tapping out songs and jingles.
  • Embrace “noisy” study time: Do not encourage quiet reading or writing time. While that may sound perfectly acceptable for other individuals with different learning styles, it does no favors for musical learners. Musical learners benefit from being able to hear their words spoken out loud before writing them down. Reading out loud is also encouraged.
  • Be patient: Above all, do not get frustrated or annoyed by the song-singing, toe-tapping musical learners. Instead of trying to get them to adapt to your way of teaching, incorporate music into your lessons somehow. Who knows, it might make the learning experience more enjoyable for all.

Musical learners can learn just as well as any other child, they just have a specific style that suits them. Use these tips to help your child excel in school by learning in a way where they feel most comfortable. If you would like to learn more about your child’s learning style, we encourage you to have them try some of our free games which explore the full range of a child’s multiple intelligences.

The theory of multiple intelligences was developed in 1983 by Dr. Howard Gardner, professor of education at Harvard University. It suggests that the traditional notion of intelligence, based on IQ testing, is far too limited. Instead, Dr. Gardner proposes eight different intelligences to account for a broader range of human potential in children and adults.

This is part 6 in our blog series covering all 8 of Howard Gardner’s proposed 8 intelligences. Click here to view Part 5.

logical learner

Logical Learner

Part 5 of 8 in our Blog Series on Howard Gardner’s Theory of Multiple Intelligences

A logical learner, also known as a mathematical learner, enjoys exercising one’s mind and applying mathematical and logical reasoning to solve problems. Highly adept at recognizing patterns, logical learners can identify connections shared by things that have no obvious relation to one another. This ability leads them to compartmentalizing information in order to understand it better.

Of course, since logical learners are also referred to as mathematical learners, they enjoy working with numbers and have a seemingly uncanny ability to solve complicated math problems. Grasping the fundamentals of complex mathematical systems, such as trigonometry and algebra, is no problem for this type of learner. In fact, it may come so easy to them that they’re capable of working out complex math problems in their head without the use of a calculator.  

Problem Solving for a Logical Learner

Logical learners create systematic ways of working through problems. Once a solution is found, the procedure is then stored in memory to be used when faced with a similar problem.

Some problem solving techniques utilized by logical learners include: setting numerical targets and budgets, progress tracking, using agendas, itineraries, and to-do lists to stay organized, and perhaps even ranking daily activities in order of importance.

Behavior and Goals of a Logical Learner

Since these types of learners are so concerned with being scientifically correct, they may be quick to point out when there are logic flaws in something a person is saying, writing, or doing. For this reason logical learners may come across as being abrasive, but they only have the best intentions in mind.

When at a job, in school, or even in one’s daily life — logical learners are strict followers of rules, processes, and procedures. However, if something doesn’t make sense to a logical learner, they may ask you to quantify it or prove it in order to see the logic in it.

Individuals with a logical learning style are likely to be motivated to pursue careers in: science, math, accounting, investigative work, law, and computer science.

Teaching a Logical Learner

  • Create lists: Studying can become more effective by creating lists of key points taken from the material being studied. Using statistics and other in-depth analyses can help further one’s understanding of the material.
  • Make it illogical: Logical learners may find it beneficial to work through a problem by making it illogical. For example, if asked to memorize the association between two elements, there’s a better chance at recalling the information if the association was made to be illogical.
  • Utilize systems thinking: Understanding the connection between various parts of a system can be made easier by utilizing systems thinking. For example, a logical learner may have an understanding of all the components that are used to build a computer, but doesn’t understand how the components communicate with each other to perform tasks. Using systems thinking can help with achieving that understanding.
  • Say no to analysis paralysis: It’s ok to over-analyze on occasion, but logical learners need to be careful not to become a victim of analyses paralyses. This is what occurs when someone spends so much time thinking about how to do something that it never gets done. Anyone should be able to see the lack of logic in spending more time planning and less time doing.

Conclusion

A logical learner can learn just as well as any other child, it all starts with understanding the learning style that works for them. Using these tips will help your child excel in school by allowing them learn in a way they feel most comfortable. If you would like to learn more about your child’s learning style, we encourage you to have them try some of our free games which explore the full range of a child’s multiple intelligences.

The theory of multiple intelligences was developed in 1983 by Dr. Howard Gardner, professor of education at Harvard University. It suggests that the traditional notion of intelligence, based on IQ testing, is far too limited. Instead, Dr. Gardner proposes eight different intelligences to account for a broader range of human potential in children and adults.

This is part 5 in our blog series covering all 8 of Howard Gardner’s proposed 8 intelligences. Click here to view Part 4.

bodily kinesthetic learner

Bodily-Kinesthetic Learner

Part 4 of 8 in our Blog Series on Howard Gardner’s Theory of Multiple Intelligences.

A bodily-kinesthetic learner, also referred to as a physical learner, is characterized by his or her inclination to use the sense of touch to explore and make sense of the world they live in. If your child is a bodily-kinesthetic learner they likely have a strong desire to take part in outdoor sports, and have a keen interest in activities that involve working with one’s hands.

The bodily-kinesthetic learning style is one of eight learning styles as defined by Howard Gardner’s theory of multiple intelligences. This type of learning style is adaptable, immediate, and is facilitated through some kind of physical action. A bodily-kinesthetic learner may enjoy hobbies such as putting together toy models, building things with legos, or working outside in the yard.

A difficulty some bodily-kinesthetic learners may experience is being able to sit in a classroom for extended periods of time. Once bodily-kinesthetic learners learn a new skill they want to put it into practice almost immediately. If you believe your child is a bodily-kinesthetic learner you can help them learn at home in ways that they wouldn’t be able to at school. For example, you can incorporate the use of touch, physical actions, and hands-on activities to help your child better grasp the material they are learning in school.  

Unlike passive learners who excel at learning through sitting in lessons, or studying reading material, bodily-kinesthetic learners need a more tactile approach towards learning. Manipulating objects, conducting experiments, and acquiring skills through repetition are a few of the primary ways that physical learners comprehend new information. These activities may include arts and crafts, building objects, repairing things, science experiments, or anything athletic.

Bodily-kinesthetic learners are not like other learners, so they should not be taught the same way as other learners. At school, and especially at home, a customized teaching method should be developed in order to assist people with this particular learning style. Here are some tips for how to teach children who are physical learners.

Teaching a Bodily-Kinesthetic Learner

Pick the Right School
Make sure your physical learner has the right environment to learn in. Instead of traditional classrooms, some schools treat their classrooms as open learning centers. This environment may be the best for your child since they will get to learn through actions rather than just sitting in on lessons. In addition to how the learning area is set up, you also have to consider how the play area is set up. The school you choose for your child should ideally have dedicated play areas where they can work with things like toy tools and building blocks. If the school is not equipped with this, you can always create the ideal play area for your child at home.

Life Experience
Throughout your child’s elementary school career they should be exposed to as much real life experience as possible. Send your child on as many school field trips as you can, as they are by far the best learning experiences for physical learners. Another way to fit more tangible learning and life-like experience into your child’s life is to get them involved with a group like the boy scouts or girl guides. Your child may end up having so much fun they won’t even realize they’re learning valuable life experience.

Athletics
Children who are physical learners love to be involved with sports and other athletic activities. At school there should be opportunities for your child to get involved with sports teams, or other physical activities like dance or gymnastics. Your child needs an outlet to express themselves through physical activities. If there aren’t any satisfactory programs for your child to get involved with at school, try looking into some after-school activities they could get involved in.

Conclusion

A bodily-kinesthetic learner can learn just as well as any other child, they just have a specific style that suits them. Use these tips to help your child excel in school by learning in a way where they feel most comfortable. If you would like to learn more about your child’s learning style, we encourage you to have them try some of our free games which explore the full range of a child’s multiple intelligences.

The theory of multiple intelligences was developed in 1983 by Dr. Howard Gardner, professor of education at Harvard University. It suggests that the traditional notion of intelligence, based on IQ testing, is far too limited. Instead, Dr. Gardner proposes eight different intelligences to account for a broader range of human potential in children and adults.

This is part 4 in our blog series covering all 8 of Howard Gardner’s proposed 8 intelligences. Click here to view Part 3.

intrapersonal learner

Intrapersonal Learner

Part 3 of 8 in our Blog Series on Howard Gardner’s Theory of Multiple Intelligences.

An intrapersonal learner is characterized by a solitary and independent learning style. This type of learner prefers to work alone rather than in groups, and learns better through self-reflection rather than engaging in more extroverted activities like discussions with others.

A learning style is an individual’s preferred style of learning. If your child has a particular learning style it doesn’t mean he or she cannot learn in other ways, it just means they learn best in one particular way.

If your child’s preferred learning style is intrapersonal learning, we’ll help you understand how you can cater to their style of learning. There are a number of ways you can help your child learn in their preferred style, we’ll go over a few of them for you in this post.

Teaching an Intrapersonal Learner

Here are some ways you can help your child excel in school, and in life, if he or she is an intrapersonal learner.

Keep a Journal
One of the top recommendations for intrapersonal learners is to get them to keep a journal of self-reflection. Have them write in the journal what they learned throughout the day, how they’re feeling about their performance in school, and any other important highlights that happened in life. This gives your child the opportunity to reflect daily on what they have learned and put it in their own words. Getting in the habit of keeping a journal could help your child better understand what they’re learning in school, as well as teach them how to express themselves in writing.

Let Them Work Alone
Intrapersonal learners prefer to work alone. We understand that as parents you want to give your child as much help in school as possible, but if your child is an intrapersonal learner they may prefer to be left alone when working on homework or projects. Give your child the opportunity to work alone if that’s what they prefer. Get to know when they really need your help with something, or when they would be better off completing a task independently.

Encourage Independent Research
Since intrapersonal learners learn best by themselves, it’s best to nurture that skill at a young age. You can do this by encouraging your child to engage in small independent research tasks. Give them a general idea of a topic, and have them report back to you with as much information as they can gather on it. If your child needs some extra encouragement, you could even include some type of reward for completing the task. Through these tasks your child will learn how to teach themselves about a subject, which will create excellent research and study skills for years to come. As an added benefit, your child gets to learn about a variety of subjects they may have otherwise not been exposed to.

Conclusion

Intrapersonal learners would rather solve a problem by going somewhere quiet and working through it alone, compared to talking the problem through with someone else. That’s perfectly OK because intrapersonal learners can excel just as well as interpersonal learners can, or as well as any other learning style for that matter.

If you would like to learn more about your child’s learning style, we encourage you to have them try some of our free games which explore the full range of a child’s multiple intelligences.

The theory of multiple intelligences was developed in 1983 by Dr. Howard Gardner, professor of education at Harvard University. It suggests that the traditional notion of intelligence, based on IQ testing, is far too limited. Instead, Dr. Gardner proposes eight different intelligences to account for a broader range of human potential in children and adults.

This is part 3 in our blog series covering all 8 of Howard Gardner’s proposed 8 intelligences. Click here to view part 2.